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corporations to pay their fair share. we voted on an approach that puts our economy first and foremost and makes sure that we are protecting, not threatening our fragile economic recovery. that is the kind of approach that is supported by the vast majority of the american people and the senate stood strongly behind that. mr. president, the senate strongly rejected the budget that passed the house of representatives yesterday. their budget would meet the goal by balancing by an arbitrary date but would do it in a way that would be devastating for our families and the economy, dismantling medicare and ending up cutting taxes for the rich while raising them on the middle class. and not only that, but it did rely on gimmicks and tricks to hit that arbitrary date. there is nothing balanced about that kind of approach, and i'm very glad that every member of the senate had an opportunity to be clear about where we stand on that. mr. president, the senate also voted yesterday to specifically reject the idea that medicare should be dismantled or voucherrized. i'm glad we had strong bipartisan s
to be fiscally responsible and reduce the deficit. to make velft to grow our economy and to meet our obligation to our seniors, to our families and to our future and the republican budget fails all three. republican budget threatens our nation by undermining our economic growth and by shifting the financial burden for the deficit, and the deficit reduction, to our seniors and the middle class. republicans have made their choices clear, end medicare as we know it, adding costs to seniors today and ending the medicare guarantee tomorrow, slashing investments necessary for economic competitiveness and giving millionaires an average of $400,000 in tax breaks. republican budget eliminates protection for millions of our sickest seniors who depend on nursing home and home health services and republican budget will increase taxes for average middle-class families by $3,000. their choices will cost two million jobs next year alone and decrease economic growth by 1.7%. in contrast, the democratic alternative present serves -- preserves the medicare guarantee and makes investments in education, innovation
are seeing now is basically trying to achieve a dynamic in the economy that is unsustainable long-term and therefore we come to the detriment of future generations and therefore i am quite concerned that keeping monetary and fiscal policies very loose for an unsustainable long period of time might generate numbers we see now that looks good for current generations but actually come at the expense of future generations. i'm quite concerned in whether we are really trying to counter something that would look at as being typical, but if it is more structural would look to a lot of stimulus at it and undermine the future. i'm quite concerned about that aspect of what we are doing. >> thank you. >> i think you have it right. he spoke of allowing people to have higher living standards, more choices in their lives and a little bit more comfortably. i can't resist taking the opportunity though to disagree with the broad spirits of his last comment. i do not leave the long run can be seated to the avatars of austerity. i am the father or stepfather of six children and on their behalf i am
it is important to realize that it is possible to make investments in our economy today, create jobs, repeal the sequester, and still reduce our deficit in a responsible and laled way. -- and balanced way. in closing i urge my colleagues not to be scared by the rhetoric that sometimes we hear. instead, i urge my colleagues to support one of the multiple budget proposals that reduce our deficit responsibly while creating jobs today and protecting the important programs like medicaid and medicare for generations to come. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back her time. the gentleman from georgia. mr. woodall: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i thank the gentlelady for being with me on the floor today. i'll say that we sometimes have some controversy in the rules committee, mr. speaker. there is a lot of responsibility that lies in the rules committee. with 435 folks here in this chamber. we all would like to have our say. we'd all like to have our say probably more than once. and the rules committee's tasked wi
and teach you. so call me at 1-800-743-cnbc. i got two of them here. you've got the good economy. tremendous housing numbers, miraculous retail sales, terrific oil and gas markets. you have the bad economy. weakening commodity prices. slow commercial real estate business. really bad world commerce outlook. real soft information technology sales. you mix them all up together and you get the absolute perfect environment for the fed reserve to stay stock market friendly. that's exactly what happened today. ben bernanke allowed the averages to power higher. dow gained 56 points. the s&p rising today, nasdaq jumping .78%. it's not sleight of hand or alchemy at work here, despite what critics say when they constantly slam the fed. >> boo! >> bernanke is not playing a game of move the stock market higher by simply continuing to keep the competition from bonds incredibly weak. he's got a real good reason for doing what he's doing, which is staying the course, keeping rates low. that reason? 1937. see, ben bernanke is a rigorous guy. he's a professor and a genuine scholar of american financial histor
to the sequester republicans will not replace. just as the economy is improving for our neighbors and small businesses back home. in contrast, the democratic alternative will cren rate 1.2 million more job, stop the sequester and in committee, democrats proposed to close those special interest tax loopholes that riddle our tax code, republicans said no. democrats proposed to offset unwise republican cuts to medical research like alzheimer's, cancer, diabetes research at n.i.h., republicans said no. democrats tried to cut the special interest spending in the tax code to offset republican cuts to students who rely on pell grants but republicans said no. mr. van hollen: i yield the gentleman another minute and a half. the chair: the gentleman is recognized. ms. castor: the democrats in the budget committee proposed to strengthen medicare and replace the republican plan to turn medicare into a voucher program. all it does is simply shift the cost tour families and older neighbors. mr. speaker, this republican budget is not consistent with american values. it is not fiscally responsible. it is a
schoolers? the right answer later in the grapevine. up next, the state of the u.s. economy. what are the chances of another recession here? for over 75 years people have saved money with...ohhh... ...with geico... ohhh...sorry! director's voice: here we go. from the top. and action for over 75 years people have saved money with gecko so.... director's voice: cut it! ...what...what did i say? gecko? i said gecko? aw... for over 75 year...(laughs. but still trying to keep it contained) director's voice: keep it together. i'm good. i'm good. for over 75...(uncontrollable laughter). what are you doing there? stop making me laugh. vo: geico. saving people money for over seventy-five years. gecko: don't look at me. don't look at me. by the armful? by the barrelful? e carful? how about...by the bowlful? campbell's soups give you nutrition, energy, and can help you keep a healthy weight. campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> bret: no major changes on the horizon in how the federal reserve is dealing with the economy. while fed chief bernanke says things are getting better not eve
this. gallup, fox news, rasmussen, after the economy, the number two concern to the people is the debt. i think there is a growing sense that government spending and government debt at these levels, it does act as a huge drag on the economy. connell: what we have been saying here, unless the interest rates start to go up, you can pull people and they can say whatever they want. their behavior will not change unless you see a spike in interest rates. >> it will be hard to get a spike in interest rates with the fed flooding the system with liquidity. the whole world is on painkillers right now. we have become addicted to liquidity, easy solutions and until the fed start to bring it in and interest rates go up, i do not see a change. dagen: do the people who are still buying taxable debt, you start to see money flowing back into u.s. stock. you see billions every week into world stock. >> i think we are somewhere close to the end of a bond bubble. for the third time in 60 years, we are looking at ten year treasury rates below inflation. that is, obviously, not a way to build over time. we
really suffered greatly throughout this week, as we noted. the economy in cyprus, is going to continue to drop. 10 to 20% is likely. this is a country that was glowerrishing before -- fluorishing before it joined eurozone, but now cyprus is taking a hair cut for greece, and greece for cyprus, and the troika is coming in to help. you cannot just jump out at this time. yet there is no room for nail failure, they are not printing more money, they will severe draconian measured. severe austerity, one country at a time, in the meantime people are weeping, imagine everything you have known to be true, is not true any more. neil: if you think about it, ty. you are a big investor, and world renounce, a lot of folks in europe, their bank acount is everything, their savings are there their vestments are in glorifies pass book savings accounts, that is it. so a trust has been broken to say nothing of the trust in european club, to keep it going. i think when you let people down, when you scare them, when you break a trust of confidence it is really katie bar the door, isn't it? >> i don't think t
food assistance to kids in this country and funding for r&d will drive our economy, but we can't appropriate a sum of money to fix the real cost of iraq. can't pay back the lives of 4,486 american men and women who have died there or the roughly 2,000 broken soldiers who came home and took their own lives. the wounded, physically and mentally, the soldiers who didn't know how not to be a soldier, the families living with a hole in their hearts and the families living with someone they no longer recognize. 10 years leaving their families, living in hell, coming home to unemployment and the homelessness, to a country that's forgotten that it's at war at all, to a country that seems to think a yellow ribbon magnet on their bumper is the only kind of support that oir troops need and the cost in iraq, untold deaths. let me rephrase that. unknown deaths. we can only guess at the destruction that we have left in our wake. 115,000 iraqis, 600,000, you can find the number, what was the long-term impact of that on the environment, the water and health? what happens when someone lives in
earnings cycle. also in this environment the u.s. economy is growing more like 2% and a lot less like 4 in that environment pricing is going to be challenged and the top line sales is not going to be universal for all firms. it will be balance sheet by balance sheet and case by case. security collection becomes far more important. >> i was going to say as you point out the profit growth picture has been pretty good but we are getting at the mature point in that cycle and the forecast is about 1% or 2% overall growth. there are always ways to make more money than the index tracking would lead you to believe. where do you think the pockets of possible better than average profits would be? >> so we do like equities. when you compare that to fixed income certainly in government space so we like equities and we like global equities. it will have to be a multi asset strategy which is kind of all of the above. looking at commodities and debt and equities and looking in companies in europe. there are good companies with strong balance sheets in europe, as well. looking into russia, indonesia, m
they are making a ton of money. >> we live in an alternate universe. there are two economies in this country. there's the economies of all of us and the island, health care economy. we've had a pretty rough time over the last four or fives, six years in our economy. there's a lot of unemployment, a lot of pressure on us. not on that island. everybody just keeps making more money. >> jon: right. >> it's as if they don't exist in the universe and worst of all, the money they are making they are taking from all of us and bankrupting the country and it's bankrupting people. 60% of the personal bankruptcies in this country come from medical bills. >> jon: what is crazy to me is when you begin to tease it apart. when you begin to deconstruct it, it's made of sand. as i'm reading it's 36 pages. as you get higher and higher in the pages you feel like chuck yaeger breaking the sound barrier. i was like oh, my god. by page ten i was like i can't take it anymore. there's something -- you cannot believe this. there's something called the charge master. >> right. >> jon: and the charge master sets the pr
in macau's economy. 2013 will look good. melco crown and boyd gaming also a standout. "after the bell" starts right now. david: so here's question, when is it tir moyle actually good for the markets and the economy? well, when it is overseas. renowned professor jeremy siegel telling us why the european crisis could be a win for the u.s. and send the markets soaring to 16,000. liz: protesters are a win for us. we'll fund out more from dr. siegel. we know the feeling standing on the corner waiting for the taxis and being surprised how much that meter ran up while you sat there in the car with traffic. a new company hopes to make that aggravation go away by making taxis obsolete. ceo of sidecar is joining us. david: want to hear about that story coming up. we'll tell you what drove today's markets with today's data download. it is a down day on wall street as investors worry what is next for the eurozone. stocks gave up gains on all three major indices, ending the trading day low. industrials and materials led the decline. well the euro extending its losses against the dollar falling mor
a campaign on jobs and the economy, jobbing and the economy, jobs and the economy and beat that drum until i beat people into sleep. that's part of it, all right, but all of the rest of this has to be added together, or we can never reconstruct this country. we will not get the pillars of american exceptionalism back together. [applause] unless we have the full spectrum. if we can restore our families and strengthen our faith and protect innocent, unborn human life instead of assaulting it with a half a billion dollars appropriated to planned parenthood in a single year. that's gotta go. obamacare has got to go. [cheers and applause] we can't let up on obamacare and believe that somehow we're going to capitulate to that side because the roads are vitality, and it is an unconstitutional taking of god-given american liberty, and it's got to go. [cheers and applause] ronald reagan omelet me down a couple -- only let me down a couple of times in eight years. one of those was 1986, and i still had the dent after i heard on the news he had signed the amnesty act of 1986. but it was on the promise
, it adopts the european style austerity approach that we've seen slow down economies in many parts of europe. we should instead be focusing on job growth and putting people back to work rather than a budget like this budget which will result in 750,000 fewer americans working by the end of this year. that's according to the independent nonpartisan congressional budget office. and it will result in more than two million fewer people working next year. it also fails the test of taking a balanced approach. because it is founded on the failed idea that combiffing another round of tax cuts to people at the very high end of the income scale will somehow trickle down and lift up all the other votes. but we know that hasn't worked and yet it is pursued once again such that everybody in e republican is asked to folks at the pt top. we offered, we democrats offered an amendment in the budget committee to say don't increase taxes on middle class americans and all the republican colleagues voted no. it it is based on the idea that we should dramatically cut investments that are important to help our eco
coming up. in the next hour we're going to be talking the economy and the dow with jennifer ericsson from the center for american progress, and then we'll talk about cpac and james homan was at cpac and he'll be here in studio with us. the president is kind of kicking back this morning. he has private meetings in the morning, getting the daily briefing and then at 4:40 this afternoon we'll be delivering marks at a women's history gathering. another hour of the "full court press" coming up. [♪ theme music ♪] >> bill: good morning, everybody. itit i is s mondayayararchch 1 18th. welcome to the "full court press" here on current tv. we're bringing you up to date on all of the latest developments here in our nation's capitol, around the country and the globe, whatever is happening we'll tell you about it. and you get to tell us what it means to you by giving us a call at 866-55-press, joining us on twitter @bpshow, and there is a civil war among republicans. sarah palin said karl rove if he's so smart he ought to go back to texas and run for office, and karl ro
than three hours from the federal reserve notes and whether or not it continues stimulating the economy at the current levels, keeps propping things up. why don't you just pick up from where we left off because talking about washington related to the bigger picture scenario not assist early today but the role the federal reserve plays in all of this as long as interest rates stay as low as they are, what do you think? >> the fed plays a big role keeping interest rates low. i heard on the fiscal side, you're right, maybe outside of the beltway the washington fatigue, but returned to the fed, everyday to indicate the fed keeps the pedal to the metal, 85 billion per month, there'll be some talk about scaling it back later this year. the thing to watch is the fed forecast. all the members put in the economic forecast for the next three years. my guess is it'll be a little bit more promising for social and employment rate above 6.5% until 2015 and that is the threshold, they will not move interest rates up before your employment rate gets to that level, that is still at least two years from
, the appropriate spending reduction so we can try to get this economy back on track. excitingt is an activity that is been on the house floor these past two days. we will likely pass that out of the house of representatives today. this is a budget by paul ryan that will allow us to get to balance. that means the government will stop sending more money than it takes in by the end of the decade, which is really exciting. what that allows us to do is to get the economy rolling, jobs being created and provide more certainty so young people coming out of college know there is going to be a job in their field. those in the workforce will know they will be needed. those in retirement, social security and medicare and those will be strengthened and security. an exciting time. guest: -- the: when it comes to continued resolution which funds the government through september, did it include sequester cuts that took effect earlier this month? spending atcludes the sequester level. there is flex ability for the military, department of defense and a few other areas that allow money to be moved to areas of
and howard ward. >> economy is getting better, capital chase returns and stocks continue to trend higher although there's profit taking here and there. >> okay. we'll take that to the bank. the key question about europe. it's all about credit quality. >> who do we have to worry about? >> spanish, italian and greece. >> you're very worried. >> people have to start doing their work. europe never did the work of fixing bank solvency in the first place. >> gentlemen, thank you for being here. >> happy monday. >> that does it for us today. make sure you join us tomorrow. right now it's time for "squawk on the street." ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >>> welcome to the last week of the first quarter. good morning. welcome to "squawk on the street." i'm carl quintanilla with melissa lee and jim kraker. futures reflecting the relief of the cyprus deal. a similar picture in europe where the italian tenure is now below where it was before those italian elections and a mixed picture in asia this morning. the nikkei up about 1.5%. the road map begin with the eurozone that did not collapse over the weekend so natura
revenues. it would cut waste, add jobs and spur economic growth of the economy. it would reduce the deficit by an additional $1.8 trillion without jeopardizing the recovery or harming the middle class. it includes $1.2 trillion in new revenue obtained not by tax increases but by closing loopholes and eliminating wasteful spending that benefits the wealthiest americans and the largest corporations. it eliminates $4 billion in annual tax breaks to the oil and gas industry, an industry that is making profits. they don't need a tax break. in fact, they're making enormous profits. so, why does the ryan budget give them a government subsidy? the democratic plan invests in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. it is designed first and foremost to help create jobs and strengthen the economy. the house democratic budget also makes critical investments in our future. $200 billion is invested in infrastructure, education, job training and innovation. helping to create jobs and strengthen the economy. these investments include $80 billion for an education jobs initiative, $50 billion
anything you hear you like you want people to hear about, it's pound just economy. so on your cell phones, on your iphones, on your computers, something you hear, something you think that's important, a speech, something from a speech, hash tag just economy. and, c-span, thank you for being here. america, hash tag just economy. [laughter] all right. so it gives me great pleasure -- i'm sorry, my name is john taylor, i'm the president and ceo of the national community reinvestment can coalition. i probably didn't want to say after i did all that tweeter/twitter stuff -- [laughter] but that's who i am. and a great honor to introduce our incoming chair, bob dickerson, from the birmingham business center. and i want to welcome him to introduce our keynote speaker, a good friend of the national community reinvestment coalition, richard cordray. so, please, join me in welcoming bob dickerson. [applause] >> thank you, john. good morning. >> morning. >> so, you know, it used to be rude to have your cell phones out during a meeting, but now since we're all tweeting -- [laughter] using that hash ta
at three bellwethers, fedex, and oracle. >> this is not ready to take off. the economy is not ready to take off. it does give us pause, maybe across the board. economy is slowing down, at least temporarily. >> ben bernanke did calm the markets yesterday. >> at this meeting, the committee judge says no adjustment. >> today, though, as investors look east to europe and ahead to an earnings season promising little profit growth, 2013's charmed life for stocks seems so yesterday. >> more now on the financial troubles in cyprus where the government is trying to come up with a plan to reorganize its banks by monday. that's the deadline set by the european union officials. if they don't, it could mean collapse of the entire banking sector. as michelle caruso-cabrera tells us, that fear is being felt on the streets. >> reporter: cyprus yet another country in europe where the devastation from the financial crisis is being felt throughout the population. throughout cyprus lines could be seen at the atms of the country's weakest bank, people desperate to take out cash because they're on the verge of f
and the austerity he is putting in place has caused the economy to be really slow. >> a lot of tax increases over there in europe. we look at this austerity bit. i want to talk about this for a second. >> i want to get back to the budget then. >> talk about what is happening in washington. you know, economics discussed on tv or on the internet or on twitter, it's so depressing, because people really don't know what they are talking about and they just sort of boil it down and there is this belief through the years, that tax cuts are not a tool used. of course, tax cuts are a tool used and tax increases something that traditional are against in bad times. we hear about austerity across great britain and we never hear about the tax increases. when you talk about the fact they cut and slash spending at the same time they hike taxes, it really was a formula made to fail. >> spending cuts and tax increases both take money out of the economy and slow the economy and, yes, they create this idea of austerity. but, look. it's a balancing problem. on the one hand you need to deal with it budgets and defici
term, do you think this economy improves second half or do you think it slows down? >> i think, as a matter of fact, we're probably in the second quarter. you'll start seeing slow growth. but i think as this summer winds, you know, goes through, we'll start seeing some growth again. i do think that by the end of the year, we're going to be not a lot higher, but i think we'll be at all-time highs as the year goes on. probably the the end of the summer, the third quarter going into the fourth quarter. i'm positive. >> so bill, because the s&p capital iq estimates call for 0.6% growth the first quarter and then it goes up to 7%. so they're expecting profits to actually reaccelerate second half. >> lee munson, you're the only outside guest buying stocks here. what are you buying here? >> you know, i'm just focusing where i need to get some more exposure. i'm focusing first on emerging markets. they've lagged year-to-date. i think they can outperform by december 31st. i like the emerging markets to add more money today. i would also say, add more money to the s&p 500 today. the only
territory showing eastern manufacturing growth in february. so is all of this a sign the economy is improving? joining me now is michelle gerard, most fabulous u.s. economist for rbs. [laughter] how do you like that? did you know your title had been changed? >> i'm going to get my business cards reprinted. melissa: fabulous, why not? [laughter] talk to me about this data. did it make you feel good about the economy? is it a sign we're moving in the right direction? >> i tell you, you know, i -- it's hard for me to believe that the economy, um, is doing as well as it is. i mean, we've still got all the uncertainty about washington, and i think, you know, what's going on in cyprus is a reminder we shouldn't be so complacent about the eurozone, but the economy is really looking to be doing better than i, um, had even hoped that it would be. you mentioned the jobless claims numbers. i mean, there's something going on there. the trend there is nicely, has moved down nicely. it really kind of corroborates the strength we've seen in the employment numbers in the last couple of months. w
of the country. high taxation and high debt are holding back the economy and the g.o.p. believes mr. obama is creating a nation at war with itself. the affluent vs. the nonaffluent. over the weekend senator ted cruze of texas, a conservative, delivered a very emotional speech at cpac. >> my father came from cuba. he had been in prison. he had been tortured in cuba. and he came to texas with nothing, with 100 in his underwear. didn't speak a word of english. washed dishes making 50 cents an hour. in someone had came up to that 18-year-old kid avenue as he was washing dishes and suggested to him that 55 years hence his son would be sworn into office as a united states senator representing the great state of texas. [ applause ] that would have been unimaginable. >> now mr. cruze says his dad made it on his own without government assistance. he worked hard and provide for his family and now his son has achieved the american dream. that's the way this country is supposed to work. but president obama himself has a very compelling story to tell. his father abandoned him. he was raised primarily b
live" starts right now. >> megyn: fox news alert how one country's economy is saved from the brink of collapse in an unprecedented move that experts say comes at a major cost for anyone who uses a bank. think your money is safe? welcome to "america live" everyone, i'm megyn kelly. a tiny little island nation of cyprus has decided today that it will fix its financial crisis by taking people's money. and that's the ultimate solution. they will seize 30-- no, make that 40% being of every bank account in which the person has over 100,000 euros, about 120 or 30,000. and that's your thanks for having money in the cypriot banks and now there are questions about the global cost of the rescue and people find new limits to the trust we put in banks. greg palkot live in cyprus outside the parliament there. greg? >> reporter: yeah, that's right, that's right, megyn. the folks here in cyprus are breathing a sigh of relief, their country is not going bankrupt, but the price paid could be high for the people here and around the world. and with the european union to cough up its share of the money
own way. toyou can go to c-span.org check out "first ladies." spoke about the economy and monetary policy. you can see all of the news conference tonight a on c-span. , our policy has two main elements. first, we decided to continue purchasing mortgage-backed perrities at a pace of -- month. it bears to emphasize that the committee has described this program in terms of a monthly pace of purchases rather than a total amount of expected purchases. evolution of the program to economic criteria. within this framework, the committee can vary the pace of purchases. at this meeting, the committee judge -- second, the committee kept the target to the federal fund rate. it will remain appropriate for a considerable time after the purchase program ends and if the economic recovery strengthens. the low range for the fund rate will be appropriate as long as the unemployment rate remains above 6.5%. if economic conditions provided in the guidance are a threshold and not triggers, crossing one or more these marshaled will not automatically lead to an increase in rates. rather the committee will
that we can't do anything about climate change that the experts are urging us to do and keep our economy growing. what's the argument to respond to that? >> well, i'll tell you, that is a myth. it's a false choice. it's a zero sum game. you either can grow the economy or you can protect the environment, okay? so i changed the question, and i've been doing this now for several years. i said, okay, here's the question: do you believe that protecting the environment harms the economy and costs jobs, has no impact on the economy or jobs, or actually grows the economy and improves jobs? okay? and what do we find? an overwhelming majority of americans, and i'm talking like two-thirds of americans, say that it either has no impact or it actually improves the economy. in fact, that's the most frequently chosen answer is that most americans don't see this as an inherent contradiction. >> what you're saying is that a big powerful industry controls or affects the outcomes of perception in this country disproportionately to what most people think? >> that's right. and, in part, they're able to do th
. by in large, of those 11 million, they're contributors to our economy. if we get it right and finally fix our broken system, we're going to have 11 million people contributing to our economy and it will be the biggest boone we could ever imagine to this economy. >> speaking of that, the economy and this economic impact, as you know, it's obviously a huge issue, and according to the center -- a study by the center of american progress, passing comprehensive immigration reform this year would create 200,000 jobs a year for the next ten years. it would add $1.4 trillion to our gdp, and it would add almost $800 billion in personal income. so the american people are going to pay a pretty heavy price if we don't get immigration reform passed this year and there's certainly an economic argument to be made. do you think that your colleagues on capitol hill, particularly those who are still resistant, understand how high the stakes are? >> i'm glad that these studies are being done. i think these studies are actually telling the truth. at the same time, unfortunately, i think the people afraid to vote
can be the linchpin in our economy over here. it's ridiculous. >> right. it should be a smaller problem. they could take care of this in other ways. they could print money or -- >> i'm not going to pick a state here. it would probably be a southern state, but a poor southern state cannot take the down the united states. >> a western state because they're not awake yet. but here we are. out of the 22 -- cyprus? >> you thought greece was small, cyprus is -- >> come on, cypriots? i remember some conflicts. i thought it was a golf course, which would be a much bigger problem to me. >> let's introduce our guest host this morning, kenny dichter, co-founder of avian. why do i always mispronounce it? because you've been b drinking it. >> avione is airplane in french and spanish. >> can we get a full shot of this? he's now the chairman of juicepress. i have been drinking this stuff for the past week, virtually, five days. >> and you know what? your skin tone has never looked better. >> no food up until this saturday. you've been doing this now -- >> 22 days. >> i've made my cleanse zero
. >>> so just where is the economy headed? according to federal reserve chief ben bernanke the economy is improving. however, interest rates will stay low now until unemployment falls below 6.5%. >>> more news from nike after the bell investors will look at nike's future orders. china trends. and gross margins for a read on consumer demand in china and here at home. >>> expectations are climbing for home sales. >>> cash-strapped cyprus banks are still closed and late night meetings broke up with no new plan b to fund the island's much need bailout. the european central bank gave cyprus until monday to work out a deal or be cut off from emergency funding. >>> closer to home, cvs is weighing in on its controversial policy to require employees to report their weight and body fat or face a health insurance premium increase. the company insists all data collected during health screenings is private. >>> fans of starbucks will be happy to know beginning in may they can also rack up rewards points with packaged coffee purchases at grocery and drugstores. >>> meanwhile, walmart is expanding it
. let's listen. >> due to the influx and further strained the economy that is already under considerable external pressures with an unstable region, the ghoebl economy recovering. but having said that as i already alluded to, we are so grateful to the u.s. assistance in solving this enormous responsibility and together continue to appeal to international community for more help to face this calamity. i had the opportunity, obviously, to talk about the peace process and we're very delighted by the vision and depth of wisdom the president showed over the past several days with israelis and palestinians. and obviously reiterate jordan's commitment to the peace process and the crucial importance of the u.s. leadership in resuming the palestinian-israeli negotiations based on the two-state solution. there is simply no other formula, no other -- two-state solution is the only way to go and if you compare that also with the radicalization of syria, together with the peace process, this is going to be a serious threat to an already volatile region. i believe there is a window of opportunity to m
increases, even some stimulus money to try to get the economy going. but it's significant that they're fighting at a lower level of intensity and turmoil. notice that the congress left for easter break without a crisis over a government shutdown. there was no crisis over potential debt limit, and government default earlier this year. could come back this summer but so long as it lasts, that's calming for the markets and good for the economy, and it may, lester, leave some space still for a compromise in which democrats would agree to changes in cuts in medicare and social security, and republicans would come up with a little bit more tax revenue, lester. >> all right, john harwood tonight, thank you. >>> president obama wrapped up his four-day visit to the middle east today, after helping israel and turkey end a three-year diplomatic dispute. that, in turn, will help the region deal with the civil war in syria. before he left today, the president turned his attention to the past, visiting jordan's ancient city of petra, one of the world's most celebrated archaeological sites. with t
new people and reunite with loved ones. critical to our economy. one out of eight american jobs depends in one way or another on travel and tourism. expected to goe to more than 230 ballot -- $230 billion in 2014. our country has benefited greatly from airline inegulation since that began 1978. government control of this industry has had unfortunate results. in the years since deregulation air fares have dropped substantially and options for travelers have expanded. these benefits are the result of free-market competition and will continue as long as the industry remains robust and competitive. despite the positive benefits of deregulation, the story of the islines in recent decades not one of unbroken success. fuel costs have led to a succession of airline bankruptcies. as federal agencies have provided assistance and assume responsibility for many pension plans, the financial stability of the airline industry is one of special concern. to help cope with changing circumstances, airlines have turned to consolidation. in the last decade alone we have than sixewer significant airl
, giving spirit. visualize a future where the economy is growing at a steady pace, entrepreneurs are building businesses, taking risks, innovating, investing, employing millions of americans come and as they employ these americans, they move them up the economic ladder. we are able to pay off our debt. they are confident and proud of their country. partys a vision tea patriots have for america's future. [cheers and applause] a constitutionally limited, fiscally responsible government, where free markets thrive. [applause] and for this vision, we have been mocked, marginalized, and maligned by president obama, nancy pelosi's, and majority leader harry reid. and people from the republican establishment, like senators john mccain and lindsey graham. our are contemptuous of vision, and our vision is distinctly different from today's reality. our country is $17 trillion in debt, and we are headed to bankruptcy. our gross domestic product shrunk, and wall street profits it. seven out of the 10 wealthiest counties in america are right here in boom town d.c. like "the hunger games." corr
and the economy, support for proxies'. if you had the opportunity to sit quietly with the supreme leader of iran and talk to him, talk him out of whatever he appears to be intending to do, what would you say to him about u.s. intentions at u.s. cooperation with our partners in the region? >> i would send dennis rodman over there. [laughter] the truth is the first thing i would do i would ask why they are doing what they're doing and i would like to hear it from him personally. because we know of course what his surrogates and proxy's are doing. i would like to know from him they close by the way, you know in that region that the three countries that have always been country, iran, turkey, egypt, they are the cornerstone of that region. it does not mean that we want to be like them or anyone want to be like them, but we have to account for the fact that those three countries are the historic cornerstones or and points of that region. the first thing i would like to is what is a they believe the future holds for the region and why are they apparently, it seems to me, on a path to try to dredge up
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